Download Abolishing Death: A Salvation Myth of Russian by Irene Masing-Delic PDF

By Irene Masing-Delic

ISBN-10: 0804719357

ISBN-13: 9780804719353

The assumption of abolishing loss of life was once some of the most influential myth-making options expressed in Russian literature from 1900 to 1930, particularly within the works of writers who attributed a "life-modeling" functionality to artwork. To them, paintings used to be to create a lifestyles so aesthetically geared up and ideal that immortality will be an inevitable final result. this concept used to be reflected within the considered a few who believed that the political revolution of 1917 could result in a revolution in simple existential proof: in particular, the idea that communism and the accompanying develop of technological know-how might finally manage to bestow actual immortality and to resurrect the lifeless. in keeping with one variation, for instance, the lifeless have been to be resurrected by way of extrapolation from the lines in their exertions left within the fabric global. the writer unearths the seeds of this notable suggestion within the erosion of conventional faith in late-nineteenth-century Russia. motivated by means of the hot strength of clinical inquiry, humankind appropriated a number of divine attributes one by one, together with omnipotence and omniscience, yet finally even aiming towards the belief of person, actual immortality, and therefore desiring to equality with God. Writers as diversified because the "decadent" Fyodor Sologub, the "political" Maxim Gorky, and the "gothic" Nikolai Ognyov created works for making mortals into gods, reworking the uncooked fabrics of present fact into legend. The booklet first outlines the ideological context of the immortalization undertaking, particularly the effect of the philosophers Fyodorov and Solovyov. the rest of the e-book includes shut readings of texts by means of Sologub, Gorky, Blok, Ognyov, and Zabolotsky. Taken jointly, the works yield the "salvation application" that tells humans how you can abolish dying and dwell endlessly in an everlasting, self-created cosmos―gods of a legend that was once made attainable by way of inventive artists, inventive scientists, and encouraged workers.

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Additional info for Abolishing Death: A Salvation Myth of Russian Twentieth-Century Literature

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If attention to issues of national identity and definition was important for travel accounts in the last third of the eighteenth century, a review of texts from the Petrine era indicates that such topics were not an explicit concern in earlier periods. Indeed, Boris Kurakin largely ignores issues of national provenance or character. Although he does occasionally describe his surroundings according to national styles—noting architecture in “the Italian style” on the way to Poland, for example, or “Dutch customs” in Königsberg (107, 114)—he rarely indicates the nationality of persons encountered or mentions his own.

Although he does occasionally describe his surroundings according to national styles—noting architecture in “the Italian style” on the way to Poland, for example, or “Dutch customs” in Königsberg (107, 114)—he rarely indicates the nationality of persons encountered or mentions his own. Kurakin describes the social, economic, and political structures of specific nations, but not distinctions between peoples: the traveler differs from his peers in the countries that he visits no more than other “foreigners” (inozemtsy) or “outsiders” (forestery, from Italian forestieri).

While Dashkova playfully deprecates her own travel writing as “scrawling” Fonvizin and the Russian Tour of Western Europe (1689-1789) 43 (barbouillage) and “scribbling” (griffonage), her insistence on literary amateurism must also be taken with a grain of salt. By 1777, she had written several verses and published both original and translated articles in addition to her earlier “Journey”; in later years, Dashkova wrote two plays and actively edited a number of journals. She was also a member of the Free Russian Society, an organization dedicated to the development of the Russian language, and founder of the Russian Academy, an institution with similar goals that she had established upon her return from Western Europe; moreover, she served as director of both the Russian Academy and the Imperial Academy of Sciences.

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