Download Acts of Implication: Suggestion and Covert Meaning in the by Irvin Ehrenpreis PDF

By Irvin Ehrenpreis

ISBN-10: 0520040473

ISBN-13: 9780520040472

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Additional resources for Acts of Implication: Suggestion and Covert Meaning in the Works of Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Austen (The Beckman Lectures, 1978)

Sample text

It may be thought that this implied a date after, or at least near, 1840, when the Penny Post is known to have been introduced. However, the main points of the 1840 reform were prepayment for the fee, standardisation at one penny, and the introduction of a stamp to show that payment had been made. The Bradford Observer of 30 January 1840 describes alterations to the counter being made at the local Post Office in consequence of the new system. But there is evidence to show that Bradford, like a number of centres in various parts of the country, ran a penny post system for some years before 1840.

We may here turn to the account of Miss A. M. F. Robinson, remembering that she talked to Haworth residents, asking questions specifically about Emily as Mrs Gaskell did not. Miss Robinson writes: She stood it, however, all that term; came back to Haworth for a brief rest at Christmas, and again left it for the hated life she led, drudging among strangers. But when spring came back, with its feverish weakness, with its beauty and memories, to that stern place of exile, she failed. Her health broke down, shattered by longresisted homesickness.

In stanza 6 'I cannot trace' becomes 'I may not trace' and thus more remote, while in line 3 'as I can trace the storms fall' would not quite scan and is replaced by a line incorporating the poet's favourite 'ocean': 'As I can hear the oceans fall'. The point ofthe change in the next stanza is unclear: the couplet 'That makes his bounding pulse rejoice I And not his pulse alone' becomes 'That makes his bounding pulse rejoice I Yet makes not his alone' with a possibly unnecessary repetition. In stanza 7, 'that' is changed twice to 'her', while an 'Eden' sky replaces a 'tranquil' sky.

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